I see this a lot in people’s characters, so here’s a really quick posing tip. Sorry for the awful 5 second drawings.
I often see characters with knees that are bent almost to the exact same in degree in each leg. See the top left legs. Boring and unnatural!
When the legs are that way, it means one of two things - either the weight is too evenly placed atop the legs or the hips are flat. Both make for uninteresting poses.
Shift the weight a little! (the middle legs)
Tilt the hips! (the bottom legs)
Bonus tip: Once you’ve shifted and tilted those hips, the shoulders are easy to figure out because the hips and shoulders nearly always oppose each other.
If that cube thing is the pelvis and the spheres are the top leg joints, tilt the hips and then tilt the shoulders the opposite way.
It’s all about the contrast. Contrast in posing, value, color, composition, proportions, timing. It adds flavor and interest - use it whenever you can.

I see this a lot in people’s characters, so here’s a really quick posing tip. Sorry for the awful 5 second drawings.

I often see characters with knees that are bent almost to the exact same in degree in each leg. See the top left legs. Boring and unnatural!

When the legs are that way, it means one of two things - either the weight is too evenly placed atop the legs or the hips are flat. Both make for uninteresting poses.

Shift the weight a little! (the middle legs)

Tilt the hips! (the bottom legs)

Bonus tip: Once you’ve shifted and tilted those hips, the shoulders are easy to figure out because the hips and shoulders nearly always oppose each other.

If that cube thing is the pelvis and the spheres are the top leg joints, tilt the hips and then tilt the shoulders the opposite way.

It’s all about the contrast. Contrast in posing, value, color, composition, proportions, timing. It adds flavor and interest - use it whenever you can.